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Thursday, 20 January 2011

Seekers - Morning Town Ride


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Source Deutros

The Seekers - Hits From The Seekers

Copmplete















Source Deutros

Rolf Harris - Jake The Peg


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Source Deutros

The Dargies - Dig The Didjeridoo


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Source Ozzie Music Man

Slim Newton - Redback On The Toilet Seat


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Source Ozzie Music Man

Slim Newton - How Did The Redback Die


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Source Ozzie Music Man

Eric Jupp And His Music - Skippy The Bush Kangaroo



Skippy the Bush Kangaroo (known commonly as Skippy) is an Australian television series created by Australian actor John McCallum, produced from 1967–1969 (airing from 1968–1970) about the adventures of a young boy and his intelligent pet kangaroo, and the various visitors to the fictional Waratah National Park in Duffys Forest, near Sydney.

Ninety-one 30-minute episodes were produced. The show was filmed in colour and after airing in its home country, it was shown in the United Kingdom and Canada, where it was first screened between 1969 and 1972. The Nine Network readily repeated the series several times after Australian television switched to colour transmission in 1975.


Ed Deveraux - Sings & Tells The Story Of Skippy



The Story Of Skippy/Skippy The Bush Kangaroo/Along The Road To Gundagai/Waltzing Matilda


Ed Devereaux (27 August 1925 – 17 December 2003) was an Australian actor, director and scriptwriter who lived in the United Kingdom for many years. He was best known for playing the part of Matt Hammond the head ranger in the Australian television series Skippy the Bush Kangaroo. He was also involved in the series behind the scenes, Devereaux writing the script and directing the episode The Veteran (1969), for which he received much critical acclaim.

Sports - So Obvious (Stiff Records UK)



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Source Sunshine

Sports - OK UK


No labels











Source Ozzie Music Man

Lynne Randell - Ciao Baby

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Source Craig A

Saturday, 15 January 2011

Jonne Sands - Mothers And Fathers



 Mothers And Fathers/Isn't It A Lovely Day/It's Your Life/ I'll Never Dance Again


 Jonne Sands was just short of his 16th birthday when he was groomed to take Normie Rowe's throne following the latter's controversial conscription. He certainly had the talent as well as the looks to make young girls swoon which brought immediate, albeit minor success in hometown Brisbane with his debut single "It's Your Life" in May 1968. His 2nd, "Mothers & Fathers" did even better, charting well Nationally, including a much needed breakthrough in Sydney & things looked promising for him. It remains perhaps the song he's best known for now

 Throughout his career, he was also a popular performer on TV shows in the southern states ie Uptight, Bandstand etc. However the hoped for ascendencence to the upper heights of pop stardom never quite happened for Jonne, despite further hits in Brisbane & a total of 6 excellent singles on the Sunshine label over the next 2 years.

 A one-off single for EMI/Columbia at the tail end of 1970 failed to reverse the trend & his last solo single, I Can Promise You Sunshine/Rikky Rikky, a picture disc on Nuclear Productions, was issued in 1973. In all of Jonne released 8 solo singles.

 Not that his career ended in 1973. On the contrary, he then joined popular 60's harmony/rock band Executives following their reformation the following year, replacing Gino Cunnico as co-lead vocalist with Carole King. With the rejuvenated group, he issued 3 further singles & the band again enjoyed much success on the Sydney Club & Cabaret circuit. They also made regular TV performances on the popular night-time variety shows of Ernie Sigley, Don Lane etc as well as appearing on the also revived Bandstand. Jonne stayed with the Executives for the next 4 years, the band finally dissolving in 1978. 

Wednesday, 12 January 2011

Daddy Cool - 1971 - DCEP



Flip/Lollipop/Jerry's Jump/Long After School days Are Through/Three O'lock Thrill


Daddy Cool is an Australian rock band formed in Melbourne in 1970 with the original line-up of Wayne Duncan (bass, Vocals), Ross Hannaford (lead guitar, bass, vocals), Ross Wilson (lead vocals, rhythm guitar, harmonica) and Gary Young (drums, vocals) . Their debut single "Eagle Rock" was released in May 1971 and stayed at number 1 on the Australian singles chart for ten weeks. Their debut July 1971 LP Daddy Who? Daddy Cool also reached number 1 and became the first Australian album to sell more than 100,000 copies. Their name comes from the 1957 song "Daddy Cool" by US rock group The Rays. Daddy Cool included their version on Daddy Who? Daddy Cool.
In November 1971, Daddy Cool aka D.C.E.P., a five-track EP was released and reached number 12. Each group member sang a track, the most widely played was "Lollipop" with vocals by Wilson.

Wesley Three - Wesley Three




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Source Dave

Kamahl - All I Have To Offer



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Source Deutros

Rolf Harris - Six White Boomers


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Source Ozzie Music Man

Rolf Haris - Two Little Boys


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Source Ozzie Music Man

Sherbet - Can You Feel It Baby


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Source AussieRock

Seekers - A World Of Our Own


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Source Deutros

The Seekers - Georgy Girl



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Source Deutros

The Purple Hearts - The Sound Of The Purple Hearts


Complete




Labels in comments








Source W.W.W.

Normie Rowe - Tell Him I'm Not Home



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Source Deutros

Normie Rowe - It Ain't Necessarily Rowe



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Source Sunshine

Noeleen Batley - Merry Christmas


The First Noel/Silent Night/Away In A Manger/O Little Town Of Bethlehem



Noeleen was born in Sydney on Christmas Day 1944. Encouraged by her mother, she began singing when she was just five and she performed wherever she could. In 1960 aged 15, she entered a talent contest at Ling Nam's Chinese Restaurant in Sydney, which Festival's A & R manager Ken Taylor had helped to establish. Noeleen won first prize, a contract with Festival. Her debut "Starry Eyes" b/w "Soldier Soldier Won't You Marry Me" was released in February 1960 on Festival's label Rex, but it was not a success. The breakthrough came with her version of "Barefoot Boy" which established Noeleen's popularity and she soon became a regular on TV shows including Six O'Clock Rock and Bandstand. Here to download is her Christmas EP released in 1961 on Festival "A Merry Christmas" (FX-10,340). Noeleen enjoyed a very prolific recording career, with around 20 singles, at least eight EPs and three LPs to her credit, most of them recorded during the peak period of her career between 1960 and 1965. In 1975, she married Stephen Stewart-Topper and settled in Essex. The couple had their first child in 1976 and although noeleen continued to work in entertainment for some time she eventually gave up performing. At last report she had moved to the USA and was living in Miami, Florida.











The Mixtures - The Mixtures



 The Pushbike Song/Henry Ford/Captain Zero/In The Summertime



The Mixtures were a rock band formed in Melbourne, Australia in 1965.

Australian musicians Terry Dean and Rod De Clerk met in Tasmania in 1965. They then met Laurie Arthur, a member of The Strangers, and the three decided to form a band together after a jam session. They quickly signed to EMI that same year and released three singles. They went through several line-up changes over the following few years, then signed to CBS Records in 1969. A few further singles followed before transferring to Fable Records in 1970.

The Mixtures recorded a cover of Mungo Jerry's "In the Summertime" and—as a result of the 1970 radio ban, during which many Australian radio stations refused to play Australian and British music released by major labels—received much more airplay than had initially been expected for a group on a small record label. The single went to #1 in Australia for six weeks. They followed up with "The Pushbike Song" (produced by David Mackay), which went to #1 in Australia for two weeks, hit #2 in the UK Singles Chart, and went to #44 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S. after being released on Sire Records.

The next single, "Henry Ford", peaked at #43 in Australia. Further line-up changes ensued before "Captain Zero" went to #6 in Australia in 1971, their last big hit. The group underwent some more line-up changes including Brenton Fosdike (Guitar, vocals), John Petcovich (Drums, Vocals) and the last member to join was Keyboard Player Rob Scott. In 1978 the band travelled to Perth to do some recording and put together a new show. During this time Bass Player Chris Spooner died in a fishing accident at Trigg Beach. The band only carried on for a further three months as a four piece before breaking up in early 1979. The remaining four members, Brenton, John, Rob and Peter Williams, then formed a new band with two other Australians, (Dennis Broad and Paul Reynolds) and the band was named BRIX.

Mississippi - Mississippi



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Source AussieRock

Matt Flinders - Picking Up Pebbles



Complete












Source Ozzie Music Man

Master's Apprentices - Master's Apprentices Vol. 2



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Source Deutros

Marty Rhone - 5 Great Hits From Godspell



No labels












Source Ozzie Music Man

Lynne Randell - Lynne Randell Presents



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Source Stampy

Lucky Starr - Lucky's Been Everywhere



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Source Ozzie Music Man

Liv Maessen - Knock Knock Who's There


Knock Knock Who's There/Don't Forget About Me/The Love Moth/Just A Little Lovin'


 
Noted for her deep, resonant contralto voice, Melbourne singer Liv Maessen launched her career in 1969 when she entered the popular TV talent quest New Faces. The young mother of two won her heat and went on to take out second place in the series final. Her prize was a recording contract with Ron Tudor's independent production company June Productions, and Liv began making TV and club appearances, building up a broad fan base that ranged from adults to pre-teens. Her first single was a song called "The Love Moth". Released on the Polydor label in Dec. 1969, it scraped into the bottom end of the national Top 40 in April 1970, peaking at #39.

Liv's second single, issued in April 1970, was a cover version of Mary Hopkin's Eurovision entry and UK hit "Knock, Knock, Who's There?". Liv's version was included in the first batch of singles released by Tudor's new record company Fable Records, and it quickly shot to the top of the Aussie charts. It became her most successful recording and one of the biggest Australian singles of the year -- it peaked at #2 nationally in June, stayed on the chart for an extraordinary 23 weeks and earned Liv the unique distinction of being the first Australian female singer ever to be awarded a Gold Record, for sales of over 50,000 copies.

Notwithstanding her considerable talent, timing was a key factor in Liv's pop success. Like several other contemporary acts including Sydney band Autumn and Fable labelmates The Mixtures, Liv's records were able to gain significant airplay due to the imposition of the 1970 Radio Ban. In May that year, just as Liv's second single was hitting the stores, a simmering "pay for play" dispute between the commercial pop stations and record companies erupted into open conflict. Most of the major recording companies operating in Australia at the time -- including EMI, Phonogram (later Polygram) and the three major American labels, CBS, RCA and leading Australian label Festival -- decided to scrap a long-standing arrangement with the commercial radio sector, demanding that commercial radio pay a new royalty for records played on air. When the commercial radio sector refused, the companies imposed a six-month ban on the supply of promotional records to commercial radio stations. British label EMI, then the market leader in Australia, was the hardest hit and many UK hits from late 1970 were only heard in Australia via local cover versions.

The main effect, in the short-term, was that the pop stations were denied free access to new major label recordings for a period of six months, so they turned to the independent labels like Fable, Image and Sparmac, who had refused to take part in the Ban. Tudor and Fable made the most of the situation by releasing locally-recorded cover versions of proven overseas hits that , because of the Ban, faced only minimal competition from the originals. Notable Fable successes included Liv's version of "Knock, Knock, Who's There?", The Mixtures' version of Mungo Jerry's "In The Summertime", and a cover of Cat Stevens' "Wild World", credited to the fictitous studio band Fourth House (the single was in fact recorded by session musicians and featured an uncredited lead vocal by Danny Robinson, ex Wild Cherries).

For her third single Liv moved into the country-pop genre with a fine rendition of Anne Murray's US hit "Snowbird" (Aug. 1970). It made the national Top 20, but this proved to be her last chart hit. Undoubtedly, the single biggest reason for the abrupt decline in Liv's commercial fortunes was the end of the Radio Ban in mid-October 1970. It's certainly notable that after three consecutive Top 40 hits in the space of a year, she had no chart success thereafter -- yet, despite this, she was voted the second most popular Australian female vocalist (after Colleen Hewett) in the Go-Set Pop Poll of that year and early in 1971 she was awarded the Goerge Wallace Memorial Award for Best New Talent at the 1971 Logie Awards.

In March 1971 she released her fourth single, "Hurry On Down", which sold only moderately and didn't chart. By this time Australian commercial radio stations were beginning to adopt a new programming regime that was being promoted by the Digamae consultancy, headed by former 2SM DJs Rod Muir and Hans Torv. The Digamae format was based on the hugely successful programming system devised by the American Drake-Chenault company, who had revolutionised American Top 40 radio in the late 1960s. The result was vastly increased ratings and profits for commercial stations, but it also meant a significant increase in the proportion of overseas (and especially American) recordings being played on commercial pop radio, whilst Australian artists like Liv found it harder and harder to get airplay.

Liv's first LP Liv For Life was issued in July 1971 and another single, "Here I Go Again" came out in October. Several more Singles followed, inlcuding a duet with labelmate Jimmy Hannan, which was released in October 1971 but sank without a trace. Sadly, none of Liv's post-1970 releases made any impression on the charts. An EP Liv Maessen, which combined her first two Singles, was issued in January 1973 as part of series of nine EPS featuring Fable artists including The Mixtures, Hans Poulsen and John Williamson. This appears to have been her last release for Fable.

In 1974 Live released a new single on the Philips, "Hey Mama, Sing Me A Song" which was apparently her last commercial recording. The single was produced by Dermot Hoy (real name Bryan Vaughan), a Sydney-born DJ, engineer and producer who spent several years in the UK in the late 1960s working at legendary British pirate station Radio London, where he was the panel operator for expatriate Aussie DJ Tony Windsor. (aka Tony Withers), a pioneering rock'n'roll DJ of the late 1950s/early '60s, and one of the original 2SM "Good Guys".

Liv continued to work in cabaret and on television for the next few years, but her career seems to have petered out in the late 1970s and nothing is currently known about what she is doing these days.












Johnny Young - Lady



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Source Deutros

John Laws - Rest A While


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Source Ozzie Music Man

Jeff Phillips - The Wonderful World Of Jeff Phillips



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Source Ozzie Music Man

Frank Ifield - Frank Ifield's Hits



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Source Deutros

Daddy Cool - The D.C. Hits E.P.


Eagle Rock/Come Back Again/Hi Honey Ho/I'll Never Smile Again


In late 1970 Daddy Cool burst onto the scene in Melbourne, Australia, delivering a vibrant upbeat mix of blues, doo wop & crazy mixed up retro rock, via underground rock music events at the T F Much Ballroom (Cathedral Hall) & by summer’s end were primed for sellout shows at the Melbourne Town Hall. Witnessing the happy mayhem firsthand producer Robie Porter signed them to his Sparmac indie label, cut an album in 2.5 days & took it back to his hometown Los Angeles for mixing. The first single ‘Eagle Rock’ b/w ‘Bom Bom’ was a sensation spending 11 straight weeks at No.1 on the national Top 40 singles chart with both tracks getting massive airplay. Their album ‘Daddy Who? Daddy Cool’ also hit No.1 & became the highest selling Australian artist rock album to that time (60,000 copies) in an era when Gold = 10,000. DC’s success led to ARIA rewriting the rules & now it takes 35,000 sales in Oz to achieve Gold Album status. By Sept 1971 Daddy Cool had played in LA, scored an international deal with Warner-Reprise Records, & at year’s end was on the road touring the US with labelmates Fleetwood Mac & Deep Purple

Back in Oz they continued to have hits with ‘Come Back Again’ & the ‘Lollipop’ EP. The 2nd album ‘Sex, Dope & Rock&Roll:Teenage Heaven’ in early 1972 spawned controversy & yet another classic single ‘Hi Honey Ho’. A 3rd US tour in support of the renamed ‘Teenage Heaven’ on Reprise found them grooving with Captain Beefheart, Little Feat, REO Speedwagon, Linda Rondstat, Ten Years After & Earth-Wind-&-Fire and consolidating new audiences in LA & the mid-west. Then suddenly it was all over. Tour pressure, lack of empathy with US management, tall poppy syndrome in Oz, whatever…Wilson pulled the plug & in August 1972 the band played a final concert at their birthplace Cathedral Hall. Recorded & released in 1973 as the magnificent double album ‘The Last Drive-In Movie Show’ its arguably the best OzRock live album ever (with the worst cover!).

Desiring to put a less retro combo together Wilson & Hannaford formed Mighty Kong who recorded one highly regarded album then promptly disbanded. By this time Wilson had begun mentoring & championing the group who was to become the Next Big Thing, smashing DC’s sales records & taking Aussie music to a new level. We’re talking about Skyhooks, whose Ross Wilson produced debut album ‘Living In The 70s’, was released in late 1974 & went on to sell 250,000 within 12 months – a phenomenal figure for that time.

DC were lured back on stage at the 3rd Sunbury Rock Festival in 1974 & stuck around for another year enduring lineup changes & infighting with their record company & releasing a mere 2 new singles before calling it quits again. Wilson went on to produce 2 more mega successful Skyhooks albums, Hannaford began a long love affair with his Reggae muse, while Young & Duncan hit a rockabilly groove with Hot Dog & later the Rocking Emus. Gary Young filled the drum chair with Jo Jo Zep & The Falcons in the late 70s & early 80s as Wilson fronted the equally popular Mondo Rock. In other words they were BUSY pretty much til the end of the 80s & fended off the many requests for a DC reformation until around 1993 when Shirl & Greg from Skyhooks approached DC about a double bill arena tour. It sounded pretty good & both bands entered the studio & started cutting tracks for albums to go with the tour. A double single was released but didn’t get much action causing the tour promoters to downgrade the tour to smaller venues which didn’t please either of the acts & so the dream bill evaporated & the 7 completed DC tracks were shelved

Fast forward to Boxing Day 2004 & the Sth E Asian Tsunami disaster. Alan Howe, editor of the Sunday Herald-Sun newspaper, called DC about headlining a benefit concert at the Myer Music Bowl. Playing to over 10,000 peeps suddenly Daddy Cool was back with great reviews & footage which lead to a 5hr ‘history of’ DVD ‘The Complete Daddy Cool’ (Aztec International) released in Nov 2005. There was also a new recording ‘The Christmas Bug’ cut for charity & boppin’ & funny & swingin’ as hard as ever.

The Cyril B. Bunter Band



No Labels











Source Barge 49

Col Joye - A Mother As Lovely As You



Complete












Source Ozzie Music Man

Buffalo - Buffalo



Suzie Sunshine/Dead Forever/Barbershop Rock/Sunrise (Come My Way)


Buffalo were an Australian rock band formed in August 1971 by founding mainstay Dave Tice on lead vocals (ex-Head). Fellow founders, also from Head, were Paul Balbi on drums, John Baxter on guitar, and Peter Wells on bass guitar; together with Alan Milano on lead vocals (ex-Mandala). Milano left after their debut album, Dead Forever... (June 1972), and Balbi was replaced on drums by Jimmy Economou. Their next two albums, Volcanic Rock (July 1973) and Only Want You For Your Body (June 1974), were also issued by Vertigo Records. After 1975 line-up changes resulted in a more commercial sound and the group disbanded in March 1977. Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, noted that there was "nothing subtle about Buffalo's primal, heavyweight sound, but it was delivered with a great deal of conviction ... combining the dense, occult riffing ... with the progressive blues chops ... the band certainly captured the arrogant disposition of the times in a bold and thunderous fashion". Alongside Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs and Blackfeather, Buffalo pioneered Australia's heavy metal, pub rock and alternative rock movements. Peter Wells died on 27 March 2006, aged 58.



Autumn - A Patch of Autumn


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Source Ozzie Music Man

The Angels - The Tour EP



 After The Rain/Who Rings The Bell/Comin' Down




Released in 1978 this EP was put out to coincide with their National tour supporting David Bowie. The EP charted at #52. Who Rings The Bell and Comin' Down are live recordings.